DANN HENDRIKS, SOUND RECORDIST, DESIGNER

“Our hearing is always active, whether consciously or subconsciously. I worry about the effects of man-made noise on the wellbeing of ourselves and our fellow non-human animals. Quiet, natural-sounding spaces are extremely rare, yet not valued appropriately. More is needed to protect, preserve and even create these places.”

 
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MARIE HALEY, STORYTELLER-HISTORIAN, ECOLOGIST

“My family has lived in this place for seven generations and I was born and raised on the family farm. One constant memory throughout my life, and I am sure it is also true for the generations before me, is of the natural quiet. In most places these days a moment of silence is noticeable, for me natural quiet is constant. We live miles from the ocean but can hear the waves crash upon the beach, we live far from the stream but can hear its energy. Each bee and bird is distinct. If a car goes down our road we get up to see who it is. We do not have commercial jets fly overhead. We are surrounded by forest and farmland and only once or twice a day we hear farm noise. Ecologically quiet is so important for the natural rhythms of animals and humans to be in harmony. Natural quiet is so important but often no one notices it until it does not exist anymore. The work of Quiet Parks is incredibly important in bringing to people’s awareness what has been lost and the places that must be saved. I know that I am one of the fortunate few that can still go to sleep at night and never be disturbed by unnatural noises, that can enjoy throughout every day the almost imperceptible sounds of nature and this gives me space in my mind and heart to wonder. With Quiet Parks I would like to protect the natural quiet here for the seventh generation after me.”

 
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LAUREN KUEHNE, RESEARCH SCIENTIST

“We inevitably think about noise from our own perspective, but this leaves out how it occurs for animals, most which actually use their hearing to survive. From the owls and bats that find their food by sound, to frogs and birds that are always listening to avoid predators, animals rely on quiet in ways that we are only just beginning to understand. As a result, we are likely to see impacts on wildlife from increased noise, but may not be able to recognize them. Preserving natural quiet is a way to help sensitive species persevere, and allows researchers to continue understanding how noise effects them.”

 

MIKE DELASHMET, AUDIO ENGINEER

"Escape the sonic landscape of the human world, and you realize how much noise you were blocking out. But then your mind lowers that defense and opens up to the sounds of nature. It’s rejuvenating, like good music. Unfortunately, it’s becoming hard to find these days"

 
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JAMIE MYSLIK, MSW RSW, SOCIAL WORKER, ECOTHERAPIST

"Quiet is essential for many forms of healing work - for listening to each other and for listening to ourselves.  And as we are starting to learn about the regulating and healing relationships between our nervous systems and the green world, protecting quiet, restorative places is more critical than ever before."

 
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BEVERLEY SPEARS, ARCHITECT

“The Earth is sacred, diverse, complex, and fascinating. It is being overrun and destroyed by people. To find an undamaged spot unpolluted by noise is rare and magical. Each such place is unique.”

 
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NICOLE DIGIRONIMO, PHILADELPHIA, PA

“I value quiet because I live and work in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Despite living in a crowded city, I’ve experienced brief moments where the only sound was wind in the trees or birds singing in the distance. We can’t lose our connection to nature. We all deserve some peace and quiet.”

 
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CHRIS YORKIE, SCARBOROUGH, ENGLAND

“I have such a deep love of nature and only feel alive when I'm out enjoying it. Sadly the reality is it's getting just so difficult to listen to it and hear what its saying. A fact brought home to me when I tried to record it. So many trips out into the wild areas where I thought nothing could interrupt the natural sounds were unfortunately spoilt by the distant noise of a vehicle or aircraft... I have resigned to the fact there are very few quiet areas left in the UK.”

 
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KELSO DUNN, ARTIST, LICHENOLOGY

“Natural quiet is fundamental to wildness—through it, we engage with an ancient rhythm that governs all life. Silence focuses our attention while allowing us to listen broadly. Protecting this resource enables us to live well with one another and honor the integrity of the places that nourish us all.”

 
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DIDIER CHABANNEAU, WRITER

“Recently, I took a decision. I want to make the planet a more silent place. Sound is such a terrible burden for both human beings and animals. Sound is everywhere. 24/7, sounds go on and on and on. They interfere with our body functions, increase stress, and make us sick. Yet sound is a silenced burden. Unless we need ear protection, sound seems to be neglected as a source of pain and disease. Only cars and low flying planes get in the picture once and a while. But there is much more over-noise that causes trouble, and that over-noise is seldom talked about.”

 
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ZOHARA RAFI, RESEARCH SCHOLAR

“I’ve always loved silence since childhood. For me, silence was the absence of din. But as a conservationist who loves bioacoustics, a silent forest makes me concerned. I am fascinated by how silence can have different meanings in different contexts. My research involves the use of acoustics to monitor animals and estimate population sizes. Bioacoustics is a non-invasive technique to sample biodiversity and that’s why I have dedicated my career to apply bioacoustics for wildlife conservation.”

 
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LAURENT MERTENS

"Modern life is rife with sound pollution. Hearing is a sense that cannot be turned off; a continuous auditory stimulus constantly requires our brain's attention, frustrating profound relaxation. For many, this has become the norm. It shouldn’t be. Quiet simply is imperative to a good health!"

 
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DEBORAH WILK, THERAPIST AND CO-FOUNDER OF MINDFUL IN THE WILD

“The quiet of nature is essential to our health and well being.”

 
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BHANTE KUSALA, BUDDHIST MONK

“Whenever I think of silence now, I think of the Buddha, the silent sage, or my friends at QPI, my partners in silence. Quiet mind allows me to dive deeper and deeper, and worry less about any upsetting waves. A favorite quote, “The quieter you become, the more you can hear - Ram Dass.”

 
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PETER H. KAHN, JR. PROFESSOR, UNIV. OF WASHINGTON, AUTHOR

“Often we listen to one another and react quickly, judgmentally. But there is another way to listen where we listen to understand. We open up. We create space in our consciousness for ideas to unfold, and for us to witness, to unite, and to Be. Quiet Big Nature helps us to listen to what really matters.”

 
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Mary Oliver, Outdoor Educator

“As an outdoor educator, natural soundscapes are a crucial part of my teaching tools and curriculum. A true, mindful and thorough understanding of the natural world requires an understanding of the soundscapes relationship to the environment. Just as humans do ecosystems use sound as a medium through which to communicate. When given the opportunity to listen in a naturally quiet place my students, most of them 10 or 11 and from metropolitan areas, are prone to adorably profound reactions and draw deep connections about the world around them. Without human noise to distract them they are able to begin to notice the nuances of bird language or simply appreciate the wind through the trees. One of the greatest joys of my life is to hear a student recount with disbelief that for the first time while outside they hear “nothing”. Then to watch as all the life and movement within that ‘nothing’ slowly reveals itself to them and their perception of their surroundings is drastically expanded.”